John Mack - Newtown Supervisor
Be on Look Out for the Spotted Lanternfly!

Be on Look Out for the Spotted Lanternfly!

As reported in the Q1 2018 issue of Townships Today newsletter:

Here we go again. First, it was the emerald ash borer that marched relentlessly from west to east across the commonwealth, leaving a trail of decimated ash trees in its wake. Now, the spotted lanternfly is threatening to spread from southeastern Pennsylvania and could wreak even more havoc than the ash borer.

According to the state Department of Agriculture, the pest poses a signicant threat to the grape, apple, and stone fruit industries, worth nearly $175 million, as well as the state’s $12 billion hardwood industry.

Consequently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded the state nearly $3 million last summer to fund control efforts and public outreach. With 13 southeastern counties under quarantine, state legislators have requested an additional $20 to $40 million in federal funding to combat the insect.

[Note: The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced in February, 2018, it is awarding $17.5 million to try and stop the spread of the invasive spotted lanternfly in southeast Pennsylvania. See the story here: http://sco.lt/6A0Ksj]

Municipalities in the quarantined counties have been asked to alert residents and post signs and information about how to recognize the spotted lanternfly. The goal is to minimize the risk of the insect leaving the quarantined area.

Given that insects don’t recognize quarantines, it is a good idea to get educated about this invasive species and watch for its arrival in your community.

Note: At the October 16, 2017, Budget Presentation before the BOS, Township Manager Kurt Ferguson, estimated that between 800 and 1,000 ash trees in the Clark Nature Center have been killed by the ash borer. These dead trees are a hazard to hikers and therefore the Township closed the hiking trails in the park.

“Quite honestly,” said Ferguson, “we probably need a million dollars to take the trees down.” Meanwhile, the budget allows for only $15,000 per year. Some trees near activities have been taken down for safety reasons. But in the end the trees have to be removed not just taken down if this is going to be a useable beautiful space. Ferguson promised to come back with a long term strategy to deal with the situation.


Posted on 14 Feb 2018, 16:49 - Category: Environment

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